PennDOT restrictions in place as frigid weather sets in for area Saturday night | WTAJ


HARRISBURG, Pa. (WTAJ) – Ahead of precipitation and potentially icy roads from Saturday night through Sunday, PennDOT has placed restrictions on several roads across the state.

Restrictions will be communicated through message boards, the 511PA travel information website and smartphone apps. Motorists can also sign up for personalized alerts on the website.

Effective at 10:00 p.m., vehicle restrictions are provided for the following roads in Level 1 of the Commonwealth Weather Vehicle Restriction Plan:

  • Highway 70 from the PA toll highway to the West Virginia border; and
  • The entire length of I-79.

Effective at 11:00 p.m., there is a level 4 restriction on the PA Turnpike I-76 (main line) in both directions from Cranberry (Exit 28) to Breezewood (Exit 161).

Effective at midnight, level 3 and level 4 restrictions are provided for the following routes:

  • I-70 from the Maryland border to the PA Turnpike (Tier 3);
  • The entire length of I-99 (Tier 4);
  • I-80 from I-79 to I-81 (Tier 4).

Effective at 2:00 a.m., level 3 and level 4 restrictions are provided for the following routes:

Level 3

  • The entire length of I-83;
  • The entire length of I-84;
  • The entire length of I-176;
  • US 22 from I-78 to the New Jersey border; and
  • US 33 from I-80 to I-78.

Level 4

  • The entire length of I-78;
  • The entire length of I-81;
  • The entire length of I-180;
  • The entire length of I-380;
  • I-80 from I-81 at the New Jersey border; and
  • PA Turnpike I-76 (main line) in both directions from Breezewood (exit 161) to Reading (exit 286).

Effective at 5:00 a.m. There are level 4 restrictions on the PA Turnpike I-76 (main line) in both directions from Reading (exit 286) to Bensalem (exit 351) as well as the entire length of I-476 (northeast extension) ) in both ways

Under Level 1 restrictions, the following vehicles are not allowed on the roads concerned:

  • Tractors without trailers;
  • Tractors pulling unloaded or lightly loaded closed trailers, open trailers or tank trailers;
  • Tractors towing unloaded or lightly loaded tandem trailers;
  • Closed freight delivery trucks that meet the definition of a CMV;
  • Passenger vehicles (cars, SUVs, vans, etc.) towing trailers;
  • Recreational vehicles / motorhomes;
  • School buses, commercial buses and coaches; and
  • motorcycles.

Under level 3 restrictions, no commercial vehicles are permitted EXCEPT single trailers loaded with chains or approved alternative traction devices. Additionally, all school buses, commercial buses, coaches, motorcycles, RVs / motor homes, and passenger vehicles (cars, SUVs, pickup trucks, etc.) are not permitted on the affected roads as long as restrictions are in place.

Under level 4 restrictions, no utility vehicle is permitted. Additionally, all school buses, commercial buses, coaches, motorcycles, RVs / motor homes, and passenger vehicles (cars, SUVs, pickup trucks, etc.) are not permitted on the affected roads as long as restrictions are in place.

Drivers should prepare or restock their emergency kits with items such as non-perishable food, water, first aid supplies, warm clothing, blanket, cell phone charger, and a small snow shovel . Motorists should tailor their kits to any specific needs they or their families have, such as baby supplies, extra medication, and pet supplies.

In the event of winter, drivers should be extremely careful when using snow removal equipment. When encountering a snow plow truck, drivers should:

  • Stay at least six car lengths behind a snow plow truck, and remember that the main plow is wider than the truck.
  • Be careful because snow plow trucks generally go much slower than other vehicles.
  • When a snowplow truck is heading towards you, get as far away from the center of the road as you can safely and remember that snow can obscure the actual width of the snowplow.
  • Never attempt to pass or stand between several trucks plowing side by side in a “plow train”. The weight of the snow thrown by the plow can quickly cause small vehicles to lose control, creating a hazard to nearby vehicles.
  • Never move next to a snow plow truck as there are blind spots where the operator cannot see, and they can sometimes be moved sideways when hitting snowdrifts or a thick snowpack.
  • Keep your lights on to help the driver see your vehicle better. Also, keep in mind that under Pennsylvania state law, vehicle lights must be on whenever a vehicle’s wipers are on due to inclement weather.

Last winter in Pennsylvania, preliminary data shows there were 301 crashes with four deaths and 143 injuries on snowy, muddy or icy roads where aggressive driving behaviors such as speeding or reckless lane changes. were factors.

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